Altus flutes

807, 907, 1007, 1107, 1207, 1307 - popular models

See Altus's homepage for specific details, we'll tell you

what they mean in real life, and in easy language for parents to understand too!

ALtus 807 logo.jpg

Altus 807 (807e)

The 807 and 807e are the same flute. All 807 have split E mechanisms, but the letter 'e' just makes this more clear.

The 807 is a great step up from Yamaha student models, apart from the more advanced mechanism will take you further as well as giving a more rounded tone.

Easy headjoint for a student to adapt to from day 1. Although a Yamaha 3 series flute has a solid silver headjoint, and this flute just a solid lip, don't be misled. This flute is more advanced. 

COST EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVES - Miyazawa MS70s, Muramatsu M85

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Altus 907 (907e)

The 907 and 907e are the same thing. All 907 have split E mechanisms, but the letter 'e' just makes this more clear.

The same mechanism as the 807, but with the solid silver headjoint.

This gives a more rounded tone, and a better experience for the player. 

If you're on a budget, the 807 is very close to the 907, but if you don' mind paying that bit extra for the improvement in tone, then the 907 is for you.

 

 The 907 is a favourite of many teachers, we often get calls from students that have been told to buy one during their lesson. As we hear this so often, it proves what a great value for money flute the 907 is.

COST EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVES - Miyazawa MS95s, Yamaha YFL 511

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Altus 1007

The first in the Altus series of solid silver (.925 grade) flutes.

Greater projection than the 907, with very little effort for the player. The entry level standard flute for professionals that are a fan of Altus. 

 

This is really Altus's competitor the the Muramatsu GX. We tend to find that the GX is more suited to the powerful player that likes projection of the high end, and wants to stand out in a performance, and as a soloist.

The 1007 has a more rounded sound where just a little energy goes a long way to producing a beautiful tone.

 

The 1007 is also great value compared to the GX which is usually around £500 more expensive.  

COST EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVES - Miyazawa MC300, Yamaha YFL 614

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Altus 1107

Britannia silver version of the 1007, Britannia silver (.958) gives a deeper tone, especially in the feeling for the player.

Identical mechanism, so this flute is easy to adapt to for an advanced player. 

 

Comparative flutes - Muramatsu DS, Sankyo Artist, Yamaha 7 series. 

 

However, for value for money, it's difficult not to recommend an 1107. Fantastic craftsmanship, top quality materials, for a more than affordable price.  

COST EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVES - Miyazawa GiBu ST, Yamaha YFL 611,714

SHUICHI TANAKA

Shuichi Tanaka.jpg

Altus was founded by Shuichi Tanaka, a very gifted flautist who had a particular fascination with headjoints. This led him on a misson with every cut & file stroke to find the magic in the headjoint that provoques a change of sound.

 

After stints at Muramatsu, and Miyazawa, as well as other makers, Tanaka-san produced his first flute in 1981. Working together with William Bennett, he made Altus renowned for their precise intonation.

There was no turning back from there as Tanaka-san opened his workshop in Azumino and the rest is history.

 

He’s also a very engaging and humble man as our owner has found out several times upon meeting him over in Japan. It’s a tribute to him that his concert flute design is mostly unchanged over many years, such was his mastery from the very beginning.

 

He still insists on parts being made by hand, and it’s Fantastic to see the flute keys, to this day being manufactured in the traditional way.

NOTE FROM PREMIER FLUTES:

If you visit Japan, it’s well worth 2-3 days in The Japanese Alps and Azumino. It’s a lovely break from the mayhem of Tokyo and Osaka! The largest wasabi farm in Japan is also in Azumino, and there are some breathtaking views.